Fire and Watershed Recovery

Colorado Geological Survey Debris and Mud Flows

-Colorado Geological Survey explains debris and mud flows and how to stay safe post-fire.  Click the link above for more information or watch the video below.

Watershed RecoveryFire-recovery-map-West-Slope Opens in new window

Grand County and Northern Water are partnering and collaborating with other critical partners to ensure the most efficient and effective coordination of emergency watershed restoration efforts in areas of Grand County affected by the East Troublesome Fire.  Please refer to the fact sheets below regarding the most recent efforts to help the watersheds recover.

February 2021 - Fact Sheet #2

January 2021 - Fact Sheet #1


For additional information on fire recovery:

Northern Water Fire Recovery Page

-Grand County and Northern Water are the main partners leading the watershed recovery effort.

USDA's Emergency Watershed Protection Program

-Grand County has applied for assistance through the Emergency Watershed Protection Program (EWP).  The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service created this program to allow communities to quickly address serious and long-lasting damages to infrastructure and to the land.

USGS East Troublesome Fire Debris Flow Map

-The United States Geological Survey (USGS) created a map depicting the likelihood of debris-flow generation and the estimates of flow magnitude in locations where debris flows initiate.  This is vitally important to assess for community safety.

Coalitions and Collaboratives Post Fire Resources

-A comprehensive page of website links that are valuable to post-fire recovery and restoration information.  Coalitions and Collaboratives says, "After a catastrophic wildfire, quick action must be taken to minimize social, environmental, and economic devastation.  Responsive action requires navigating a complex maze of diverse landowners, community organizations, and numerous local and federal requirements."

SKYWARN VOLUNTEER

Grand County needs your help! You can help keep our communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service.  SKYWARN volunteer storm spotters are part of the Nation's first line of defense against severe weather and assist with an early warning system.

To become a SKYWARN VOLUNTEER click here for more information. Training is FREE and open to the public.  You can become a certified Skywarn severe weather spotter by attending a virtual training.


Wastewater Resources

If you or someone you know was impacted review the wastewater resources below: